Tuesday, 08 June 2021 00:00

Athlete’s foot is a very contagious fungal infection that causes the feet to become itchy, cracked, dry and flaky. Because Athlete’s foot thrives in warm and moist environments, these infections are usually spread in showers, gym locker rooms, and swimming pools from towels, floors, and even clothing. It can also spread from direct contact with an infected person. If it is left untreated, it can spread to all of the toes and into the toenails causing them to become thicker and yellow. The infection can also spread to other parts of the body. Patients who believe that they have Athlete’s foot should consult with a podiatrist who can provide a diagnosis and treatment.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Kenneth J. D'Ortone, DPM from Center for Foot and Ankle Excellence.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Thursday, 03 June 2021 00:00

Unsightly toenails or cracked heels? If your feet are still suffering from the harshness of this past winter, schedule an appointment to give them the care they need.

Wednesday, 02 June 2021 00:00

Sesamoid bones are unique in that they are not connected to other bones (which is normally the case with bones). Sesamoids are either embedded in muscles or connected to tendons. The kneecap (patella bone) is the largest sesamoid bone in the body. There are two little sesamoids in the foot which help the big toe move, enable the foot to push off, and serve as shock absorbers for the ball of the foot. When these sesamoids become fractured, irritated or inflamed due to repetitive pressure, overuse, or other contributing factors, it is known as sesamoiditis. Sesamoiditis can be quite painful, making it very difficult to walk. If sesamoiditis is not treated properly and promptly, other areas of the foot may become inflamed or even injured. If you are experiencing pain under the big toe and are having difficulty bending and straightening it, consult a podiatrist to see if you have sesamoiditis and receive proper care if you do.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Kenneth J. D'Ortone, DPM of Center for Foot and Ankle Excellence. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Wednesday, 02 June 2021 00:00

Common symptoms that often accompany the medical condition that is known as cuboid syndrome can include pain while putting weight on the outside of the foot, in addition to discomfort in the middle of the foot while walking. The cuboid bone is one of several bones that are located in each foot, and cuboid syndrome can develop if the surrounding ligaments and tendons become inflamed. This can occur from a sudden injury, or from repetitive motion that is common in ballet dancers. Relief may be found when a cushioned pad is placed in the shoe that lies underneath the bone, and it may help to perform heel exercises. If you have pain in this part of your foot, please confer with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can diagnose and treat cuboid syndrome.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Kenneth J. D'Ortone, DPM from Center for Foot and Ankle Excellence. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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